Example essays on trifles

example essays trifles on. Indeed, it seems likely that an element of this joyous rebound from a half-developed state of fear entered into much of this child’s laughter, already illustrated, on succeeding in a rather risky experiment, such as climbing the staircase. Thus you must have a good coat to your back; for they have no uniform to give you. But in Swinburne there is no _pure_ beauty—no pure beauty of sound, or of image, or of idea. If the unknown bulks too largely and comes near the point of the alarming, the effect of laughter is wholly counteracted. The patience of the Virgin being at last exhausted, she appeared in a vision to a certain smith, commanding him to summon the impious Israelite to the field. The annals of Mexico fare no better before the fire of criticism. This indecorous system prevailed in some parts of Scotland not many years since. It might be called _picture-talking_. And this, I believe, accords with the results of observation. In later years a thesis also has formed part of the examination for Class A. {387} In modern literature, the interesting point to note is the growing interpenetration of the laughing and the serious attitude, and the coalescence of the mirthful spirit with sentiment. There is another consideration to be attended to, which is that sensible impressions appear to be continually made on the same part of the brain in succession:—with respect to example essays on trifles those received by the eye, a new set of objects is almost every moment impressed on the whole organ, and consequently transmitted along the nerves to the same receptacle in the brain.[91] It follows from this last observation in particular (which is not a speculative refinement but a plain matter of fact) that the sphere occupied by different vibrations is constantly the same, or that the same region of the brain belongs equally to a thousand different impressions, and consequently that the mere circumstance of situation is insufficient to account for that complete distinctness, of which our ideas are capable. Qualifications for the different grades differed, but in quantity and advancement, rather than in quality, all coming under the heads of literature, language, general information and library economy. It may be assumed as a matter of common recognition that this field of laughable objects will lie in the main within the limits of the spectacle of human life. Offences committed against property, burning, forcible seizure, and other wrongs, even without defiance, were specifically declared not subject to its decision, the body of the plaintiff being its only recognized justification.[720] Even in this limited sphere, the consent of both parties was requisite, for the appellant could prosecute in the ordinary legal manner, and the defendant, if challenged to battle, could elect to have the case tried by witnesses or inquest, nor could the king himself refuse him the right to do so.[721] When to this is added that a preliminary trial was requisite to decide whether the alleged offence was treacherous in its character or not, it will be seen that the combat was hedged around with such difficulties as rendered its presence on the statute book scarcely more than an unmeaning concession to popular prejudice; and if anything were wanting to prove the utter contempt of the legislator for the decisions of the battle-trial, it is to be found in the regulation that if the accused was killed on the field, without confessing the imputed crime, he was to be pronounced innocent, as one who had fallen in vindicating the truth.[722] The same desire to restrict the duel within the narrowest possible limits is shown in the rules concerning the employment of champions, which have been already alluded to. Gained sometimes in a happy moment, it may persist for long years, successfully defying all assaults; achieved elsewhere by decades of strenuous application and scrupulous observance, it may vanish in a day as the result of some petty act of forgetfulness or of the stupidity of a passing moment. I have recently visited Miss Hewins’ office in the Hartford Public Library. This is yet more clearly illustrated by the fact that comedy, as we shall see, holds up to a gentle laughter want of moderation even in qualities which we admire, such as warmth of feeling, refinement of sentiment, and conscientiousness itself. And now is many an offer made Of home and hospitable aid, By those who throng around the maid, To them the monk his charge commends, With promises of bounteous pay, And with a heart of trouble wends His steps to Broomholme Abbey “grey.” * * * * * * What charm is there in Nature’s smile, When Hope be dead the weary while, Or what in all the world can please, When aching hearts are ill at ease. The public library can do no more helpful thing to our modern life than to assist the public to understand and love it. Such is the postal card. It is an agreeable pastime, too, for our half-retired observer to watch the fierce struggles of men and women in these days to gain a footing within the charmed circle. They are many feet in height, covered by a dense forest of primeval appearance, and are undoubtedly of human origin. The words _arboris_ and _Herculi_, while they involve in {312} their signification the same relation expressed by the English prepositions _of_ and _to_, are not, like those prepositions, general words, which can be applied to express the same relation between whatever other objects it might be observed to subsist. Shakespear’s witches are nearly exploded on the stage. But walk forth without repining; without murmuring or complaining. He never forgives himself for even a slip of the tongue, that implies an assumption of superiority over any one. Tennyson is a very fair example of a poet almost wholly encrusted with parasitic opinion, almost wholly merged into his environment. Yet, in 1730, we find the learned Baron Senckenberg reproducing Zanger’s treatise, not as an arch?ological curiosity, but as a practical text-book for the guidance of lawyers and judges. The precise nature of the sensations is not yet fully understood. At the same time the absolute character of the compurgatorial oath was too strong an incentive to perjury, ignorant or wilful, for conscientious minds to reconcile themselves to the practice, and efforts commenced to modify it. There is no heightening of conscious charms to produce greater effect, no studying of airs and graces in the glass of vanity. Spurzheim adds shortly after— ‘We every where find the same species; whether man stain his skin, or powder his hair; whether he dance to the sound of a drum or to the music of a concert; whether he adore the stars, the sun, the moon, or the God of Christians. “The evidence of attendants, who have been employed, previously to the admission of patients into the retreat, is not considered a sufficient reason for any extraordinary restraint; and cases have occurred, in which persuasion and kind treatment have superseded the necessity of any coercive means. I think the analogy is conclusive against our author. As this distinction is very difficult to be expressed, I hope I may be allowed to express it in the best way that I am able. So, when Charles V. By this, a man accused of a charge resting on presumptions and incompletely proved, was required to clear himself with four compurgators of his own rank, who swore, as provided in the decretals of Innocent III., to their belief in his innocence.[262] CHAPTER VIII. These questions appear to be best approached by a reference to the results of our study of comedy. To him it has all the graces of novelty; we enter into the surprise and admiration which it naturally excites in him, but which it is no longer capable of exciting in us; we consider all the ideas which it presents rather in the light in which they appear to him, than in that in which they appear to ourselves, and we are amused by sympathy with his amusement which thus enlivens our own. Along with these lower forms we find higher ones, in which some amount of reference to social standards is discoverable. This is also one of the languages which has been announced as “neither polysynthetic nor incorporative,” and the construction of its verb as “simple to the last degree.”[327] We know the tongue only through the Grammar and Phrase-Book of Father de la Cuesta, who acknowledges himself to be very imperfectly acquainted with it.[328] With its associated dialects, it was spoken near the site of the present city of San Francisco, California. No nation has yet been discovered so uncivilized as to be altogether without them. But our examination of the instance of the ill-matched hat and head supplied by Dr. Nay, so unjust are mankind in this respect, that though the intended benefit should be procured, yet if it is not procured by the means of a particular benefactor, they are apt to think that less gratitude is due to the man, who with the best intentions in the world could do no more than help it a little forward. (_See his spirited Letter to his cousin Ludovico, on seeing the pictures at Parma._) The greatest pleasure in life is that of reading, while we are young. It should not be necessary to tell librarians that the best way to make such a collection as this is not to search for each element by itself but to gather miscellaneous related material in quantity and then sort it. In the great Pacific, also, it is very perceivable; but the places where it is most obvious are, as it was said, in those straits which join one ocean to another. These Nodes of the Moon are in continual motion, and in eighteen or nineteen years, revolve backwards, from east to west, through all the different points of the Ecliptic. Such a state of partial fusion may be illustrated in our moods of memory, in which delight in the recovery of lost experiences is tempered with regret. The fair sex, who have commonly much more tenderness than ours, have seldom so much generosity. His experience, it seems, had not led him to observe any other river. Man, it has been said, has a natural love for society, and desires that the union of mankind should be preserved for its own sake, and though he himself was to derive no benefit from it. That fellow is still to be met with somewhere in our time. We find none of the triumphant buoyancy of health and spirit as in the _Titian’s Mistress_, nor the luxurious softness of the portrait of the Marchioness of Guasto, nor the flexible, tremulous sensibility, nor the anxious attention to passing circumstances, nor the familiar look of the lady by Vandyke; on the contrary, there is a complete unity and concentration of expression, the whole is wrought up and moulded into one intense feeling, but that feeling fixed on objects remote, refined, and etherial as the form of the fair supplicant. ‘Never ending, still beginning,’ his mind seemed entirely made up of points and fractions, nor could he by any means arrive at a conclusion or a valuable whole. Still it was gradually winning its way against popular repugnance, for we have in 1260 a charter from Alphonse de Poitiers to the town of Auzon (Auvergne), in which he grants exemption from torture in all trials irrespective of the gravity of the crime.[1558] While giving due weight, however, to all this, we must not lose sight of the fact that the laws and regulations prescribed in royal ordonnances and legal text-books were practically applicable only to a portion of the population. The familiarity of those bodies to the mind, naturally disposed it to look for some resemblance to them in whatever else was presented to its consideration. From some one or other of those principles which I have been endeavouring to unfold, every system of morality that ever had any reputation in the world has, perhaps, ultimately been derived. You throw a bit of stick for him to fetch, and having picked it up he proceeds to carry it away some distance and to squat down with it on the ground just before him. For in this sense each man is a microcosm. If we are not contented with this feeling on the subject, we shall never sit in Cassiopeia’s chair, nor will our names, studding Ariadne’s crown or streaming with Berenice’s locks, ever make ‘the face of heaven so bright, That birds shall sing, and think it were not night.’ Those who are in love only with noise and show, instead of devoting themselves to a life of study, had better hire a booth at Bartlemy-Fair, or march at the head of a recruiting regiment with drums beating and colours flying! This melancholy, or state of depression, caused by the activity of the depressing passions, is to be distinguished from the state of exhaustion and debility, which succeeds some violent paroxysms, or which follows an exhausted state of body and mind from overexertion, and assumes either an apparent melancholy character, from torpor or partial suspension of mind, or is in reality a case of melancholia of the most miserable description, from the exclusive activity of these depressing passions, which are then more likely to become the sole masters of the field of action.” {16} In example essays on trifles the former mentioned cases, it appears, that the exciting and depressing passions alternately take on habitudes of action, so that it is still over excitement, but the effects, from its direction being different, are diametrically opposed to each other: in the one case, as I have already said, this nervous energy is employed in exciting into activity the passions which exhilirate: in the other, those which depress us. These, says Mr. Proceedings, but probably no one would maintain that these do, or possibly could, give an adequate idea of the character or extent of the work that our libraries are doing. H. If it inclines us to resent the wrongs of others, it impels us to be as impatient of their prosperity. In the best works of the last-named writer we have something of Shakespeare’s art of adding a pregnant observation which, so far from disturbing, rather furthers the mood needed for a due appreciation of the action. He will browse about, finding a dozen things that he understands and a hundred that he does not. So long as the individual exists, and remains entire, this principle is satisfied. Dr. Time in general is supposed to move faster or slower, as we attend more or less to the succession of our ideas, in the same manner as distance is increased or lessened by the greater or less variety of intervening objects. The application of this system of grading to the staff, as it existed, involved discrimination at only one point–that separating Classes B and C, or as renamed later, C and D. IF we examine the most celebrated and remarkable of the different theories which have been given concerning the nature and origin of our moral sentiments, we shall find that almost all of them coincide with some part or other of that which I have been endeavouring to give an account of; and that if every thing which has already been said be fully considered, we shall be at no loss to explain what was the view or aspect of nature which led each particular author to form his particular system. Even during the play he can enjoy no part of the pleasure which it is capable of affording. For the mind can take, it can have no interest in any thing, that is an object of practical pursuit, but what is strictly imaginary: it is absurd to suppose that it can have a _real_ interest in any such object directly whether relating to ourselves, or others (this has been I trust sufficiently shewn already): neither can the reality of my example essays on trifles future interest in any object give me a real interest in that object at present, unless it could be shewn that in consequence of my being the same individual I have a necessary sympathy with my future sensations of pleasure or pain, by which means they produce in me the same mechanical impulses as if their objects were really present. I must then look out for some other latent cause in the rabble of contradictory pretensions huddled together, which I had not noticed before, and to which I am eventually led by finding a necessity for it. The poets and romance writers, who best paint the refinements and delicacies of love and friendship, and of all other private and domestic affections, Racine and Voltaire; Richardson, Maurivaux, and Riccoboni; are, in such cases, much better instructors than the philosophers Zeno, Chrysippus, or Epictetus. He might as a poet have concentrated his attention upon the technical problems solved or tackled by these men; he might have traced for us the development of blank verse from Sackville to the mature Shakespeare, and its degeneration from Shakespeare to Milton. —– THE measure of the verses, of which the octave of the Italians, their terzetti, and the greater part of their sonnets, are composed, seems to be as nearly the same with that of the English Heroic Rhyme, as the different genius and pronunciation of the two languages will permit. But it is a very ancient and well-established axiom in metaphysics, that nothing can act where it is not; and this axiom, it must, I think, be acknowledged, is at least perfectly agreeable to our natural and usual habits of thinking. One fears that this was felt to be present, for example, by the women victimised by the men’s coarse teasing. Let us first take a glance at the hilarious appreciation of the _other_ tribe’s ways. I do not say at once that this is Mr. {392} CHAPTER XII. The humble, admiring, and flattering friends, whom Alexander left in power and authority behind him, divided his empire among themselves, and after having thus robbed his family and kindred of their inheritance, put, one after another, every single surviving individual of them, whether male or female, to death. He not unnaturally dislikes the idea of his daily pastime being made the subject of grave inquiry. In the eighteenth century there arose a school, associated with the names of the third Lord Shaftesbury and Francis Hutcheson, the Scotch philosopher, which became known as the “moral sense” school, widely different from the old hedonistic philosophers, since they were the first to assert the existence of a distinctively ethical, as opposed to a merely pleasurable, feeling. Are they on any better terms with their own families or friends? It is one of the beauties of public library work that the points at which it touches life in general are many. It may often, however, be hard to convince him that the prosperity and preservation of the state requires any diminution of the powers, privileges, and immunities of his own particular order of society. Any athlete, who confided in his strength and dexterity with his weapons, could acquire property by simply challenging its owner to surrender his land or fight for it. Yet he mentions that in one part, which I judge to be somewhere in Louisiana, the natives were accustomed to erect their dwellings on steep hills and around their base _to dig a ditch_, as a means of defence.[63] Our next authorities are very important. He it must be who is to decide on general policies or go to his Board for a decision in cases so important that he feels their action necessary.